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It is not uncommon for some bars to have karaoke performances seven nights a week.commonly with high-end sound equipment superior to the small, stand-alone consumer versions.Karaoke machines were initially placed in restaurants and hotel rooms; soon, new businesses called karaoke boxes, with compartmented rooms, became popular.In 2004, Daisuke Inoue was awarded the tongue-in-cheek Ig Nobel Peace Prize for inventing karaoke, "thereby providing an entirely new way for people to learn to tolerate each other." Karaoke soon spread to the rest of Asia and other countries all over the world.Lyrics are usually displayed on a video screen, along with a moving symbol, changing color, or music video images, to guide the singer.In several Asian countries such as China, Cambodia or the Philippines, a karaoke box is called a KTV.), is a form of interactive entertainment or video game developed in Japan in which an amateur singer sings along with recorded music (a music video) using a microphone.The music is typically an instrumental version of a well-known popular song.

Originally, it was considered a somewhat expensive fad, as it lacked the live atmosphere of a real performance and 100 yen in the 1970s was the price of two typical lunches, but it caught on as a popular kind of entertainment.Many artists, amateur and professional, perform in situations where a full band/orchestra is either logistically or financially impractical, so they use a "karaoke" recording; they are, however, the original artists.(This is not to be confused with "lip synching," in which a performer mimes to a previously produced studio recording with the lead vocal intact.) From 1961–1966, the American TV network NBC carried a karaoke-like series, Sing Along with Mitch, featuring host Mitch Miller and a chorus, which superimposed the lyrics to their songs near the bottom of the TV screen for home audience participation.Many low-end entertainment systems have a karaoke mode that attempts to remove the vocal track from regular audio CDs, using an Out Of Phase Stereo (OOPS) technique.This is done by center channel extraction, which exploits the fact that in most stereo recordings the vocals are in the center.

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